Death In Greek Mythology: Charons Obol Unknown Author 328

ISBN: 9781156735725

Published: July 27th 2011

58 pages


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Death In Greek Mythology: Charons Obol  by  Unknown Author 328

Death In Greek Mythology: Charons Obol by Unknown Author 328
July 27th 2011 | | PDF, EPUB, FB2, DjVu, talking book, mp3, ZIP | 58 pages | ISBN: 9781156735725 | 7.27 Mb

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 51. Chapters: Death in Greek philosophy, Greek underworld, Persephone, Cerberus, Reincarnation, Castor and Pollux,MorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online.

Pages: 51. Chapters: Death in Greek philosophy, Greek underworld, Persephone, Cerberus, Reincarnation, Castor and Pollux, Tisiphone, Acherusia, Chariot Allegory, Charons obol, Phaedrus, Metaphysics, Phaedo, Hades in Christianity, Myth of Er, Peregrinus, Nekyia, Anamnesis, Ploutonion, Somnium Scipionis, Katabasis, Fortunate Isles, Shade, Eurynomos, Aornum. Excerpt: Charons obol is an allusive term for the coin placed in or on the mouth of a dead person before burial.

According to Greek and Latin literary sources, the coin was a payment or bribe for the ferryman who conveyed souls across the river that divided the world of the living from the world of the dead. Archaeological examples of these coins have been called the most famous grave goods from antiquity. The custom is primarily associated with the ancient Greeks and Romans, but is found also in the Near East, and later in Western Europe, particularly in the regions inhabited by Celts of the Gallo-Roman, Hispano-Roman and Romano-British cultures, and among Germanic peoples of late antiquity and the early Christian era, with sporadic examples into the early 20th century.

Although archaeology shows that the myth reflects an actual custom, the placement of coins with the dead was neither pervasive nor confined to a single coin in the deceaseds mouth. In many burials, inscribed metal-leaf tablets or exonumia take the place of the coin, or gold-foil crosses in the early Christian era. The presence of coins or a coin-hoard in Germanic ship-burials suggests an analogous concept.

The phrase Charons obol as used by archaeologists sometimes can be understood as referring to a particular religious rite, but often serves as a kind of shorthand for coinage as grave goods presumed to further the deceaseds passage into the afterlife.

In Latin, Charons obol sometimes is called a viaticum, o...



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